Custody battle in Japan highlights loophole in child abduction cases (The Guardian)

© The Guardian

Shane Clarke had no reason to be suspicious when his wife took their two children to Japan to see their ill grandmother in January.

The couple had married four years earlier after meeting online, and settled down with their daughters, aged three and one, in the west Midlands. Clarke, they agreed, would join his family in Japan in May for a holiday, and they would all return together.

Last week, however, he faced his wife and her lawyer in a Japanese courtroom, uncertain if he would ever see his children again. When his wife left the UK, Clarke now believes, she never had any intention of returning with him, or of letting her children see him.

« From the moment I met her at Narita airport I knew something was wrong, » Clarke told the Guardian before a custody hearing in Mito, north of Tokyo. « I soon realised she’d played me like a grand piano. The whole thing had been orchestrated, » he claims.

Clarke, a 38-year-old management consultant from West Bromwich, has gone to great lengths to win custody. The Crown Prosecution Service said his wife could be prosecuted in the UK under the 1984 child abduction act.

However, he can expect little sympathy from Japanese courts, which do not recognise parental child abduction as a crime and habitually rule in favour of the custodial – Japanese – parent.

Japan is the only G7 nation not to have signed the 1980 Hague convention on civil aspects of child abduction, which requires parents accused of abducting their children to return them to their country of habitual residence. He is one of an estimated 10,000 parents, divorced or separated from their Japanese spouses, who have been denied access to their children. Since the Hague treaty came into effect, not a single ruling in Japan has gone in favour of the foreign parent.

Campaigners say Japan’s refusal to join the treaty’s 80 other signatories has turned it into a haven for child abductors.

The European Union, Canada and the US have urged Japan to sign, but Takao Tanase, a law professor at Chuo University, says international pressure is unlikely to have much impact. « In Japan, if the child is secure in its new environment and doesn’t want more disruption, family courts don’t believe that it is in the child’s best interest to force it to see the non-custodial parent, » he said.

Japanese courts prefer to leave it to divorced couples to negotiate custody arrangements, Takase said. Officials say the government is looking at signing the Hague treaty, though not soon.

« We recognise that the convention is a useful tool to secure children’s rights and we are seriously considering the possibility of signing the convention, but we’ve yet to reach a conclusion, » said Yasuhisa Kawamura, a foreign ministry spokesman.

« We understand the anxieties of international parents, but there is no difference between the western approach and ours. »

Clarke’s two custody hearings this week did not go well. An interpreter arranged by the foreign office failed to materialise. The British embassy in Tokyo provided him with a list of alternative interpreters but said it could offer no more help.

The judge was forced to postpone his ruling, but Clarke is convinced he will never see his daughters again.

« We are talking about two British citizens, and no one will help me. The message our government is sending out to foreign nationals is that it’s perfectly all right for them to commit a crime on British soil, and as long as they leave the country quickly enough, they’ll get away scot-free. »
Backstory

The rise in the number of parental child abductions has been fuelled by a dramatic increase in marriages between Japanese and foreign nationals. According to the health and welfare ministry, there were 44,701 such marriages in 2006, compared with 7,261 in 1980, the vast majority between Japanese and Chinese, Koreans and Filipinos. An estimated 20,000 children are born to Japanese-foreign couples every year. Though Japan does not keep an official count, there are 47 unresolved cases of US children being taken to Japan – only Mexico and India are more popular destinations – and 30 involving Canadian citizens. British officials are dealing with 10 cases, a foreign office spokeswoman told the Guardian, including that of Shane Clarke.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/sep/15/japan.childprotection

Custody battles : an unfair fight (Japan Times)

Copyright Japan Times
Article original ICI.

Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2008

THE ZEIT GIST
Custody battles: an unfair fight

By MICHAEL HASSETT

« Sport at its best obliterates divisions between peoples, such as ostentatious flag-waving and exaggerated national sentiment. » New York Times senior writer Howard W. French — who has covered China for the past five years, was Tokyo bureau chief from 1999 to 2003, and has lived overseas for all but 3 1/2 years since 1979 — made this astute observation last month after staying up most of the night in Shanghai to watch the remarkable five-set Wimbledon final between Spain’s Rafael Nadal and Switzerland’s Roger Federer.

Only four days into the long-awaited Beijing Olympics, we can only lament the regression that has taken place after only a month and will most certainly intensify over the next 12 days, in what media often infuses into our very beings as « us vs. them. » Unfortunately, here in Japan, it is not only the media that eagerly participates in this engine of propaganda — it’s the education system itself.

As many may know, in response to new curriculum guidelines introduced in the 2002 school year that included the fostering of « feelings of love for one’s country » as an objective for sixth-grade social studies, students at a number of public elementary schools around the nation have since been subjected to evaluations on their love for Japan. Moreover, in December 2006 this country’s basso ostinato of excessive pride bordering on jingoistic fanaticism ground on as the ruling bloc in the Diet forced through revisions to the Fundamental Law of Education by removing a reference to « respecting the value of the individual » and instead calling on schools to cultivate in students a « love of the national homeland. »

But what impact does this have on families here in which one parent is Japanese and the other is not? A relationship between individuals from different countries will generally experience great friction when one or both of the partners remain more committed to their nationality than they do to their spouse — in other words, when they are more married to their country than they are to each other. And this can become exacerbated when children are encouraged to side with one country or the other. Or, in Japan’s case, taught to love Nippon and then graded on patriotism.

One year ago, The Japan Times (Zeit Gist, Aug. 7) printed some findings of mine that showed that there is a 21.1-percent likelihood that a man who marries a Japanese national will do the following: create at least one child with his spouse (85.2 percent probability), then divorce within the first 20 years of marriage (31 percent), and subsequently lose custody of any children (80 percent). And in a country such as Japan — one that has no visitation rights and neither statutes nor judicial precedents providing for joint custody — loss of custody often translates into complete loss of contact, depending on the desire of the mother.

And if this figure is not startling enough, this year’s calculation using more current data would leave us with an even higher likelihood: 22 percent. Having this information, we must now ask a question that most of us would dread presenting to a friend in a fog of engagement glee: Is it the behavior of a wise man to pursue a course of action that has such a high probability of leaving your future children without any contact with their own father?

Most of us enter a marriage with the realization that divorce is a possibility. Of course, we don’t hope for a breakup, but we accept that unions do occasionally dissolve, and heartbreak — usually temporary — will often result. However, do we ever enter marriage thinking beyond our own selves to the realization that there is a substantial likelihood that our own children — our personal flesh and blood — will be ripped from our lives? Doubtful. But in this country, this loss happens to one in every four fathers. Does it happen more to non-Japanese men? Most likely not. The divorce-to-marriage ratio for relationships between Japanese women and foreign men was nearly 39 percent in 2006. For the entire nation it was 41 percent.

And non-Japanese women married to Japanese men should not rest too comfortably either. Their divorce-to-marriage ratio was over 38 percent in 2006. And even though mothers are usually awarded custody of children, it has been widely reported that foreign parents here in Japan are almost never successful in custody claims, and even if the foreign parent is lucky enough to eventually be granted custody, effecting such a court order may prove very difficult because law enforcement generally prefers to remain uninvolved in these complicated, emotion-filled cases. According to Colin P. A. Jones, a professor at Doshisha Law School in Kyoto, « family courts will usually do what is easy, and giving custody to the Japanese parent is usually going to be easier. »

David Hearn, director of « From the Shadows » ( www.fromtheshadowsmovie.com ), a documentary in production about child abduction by parents and relatives in Japan, says that he has so far come across only two cases in which non-Japanese had physical custody going into divorce proceedings and received custody at the ruling. And in one of these two cases, the Japanese parent did not put up much of a fight for the children.

According to Hearn, « Whoever has the children when proceedings begin gets sole custody of the children in virtually every case. It’s then easy to understand why parents do such cruel things to each other, and the kids, to get physical custody before divorce is petitioned for and custody is decided in family court. »

Now, when criticism of Japan or the Japanese system is presented, two forms of rebuttal are common: 1) It’s just as bad or worse elsewhere (as if this somehow justifies poor conditions here); or 2) It has never happened to me (as if a pattern can’t exist unless that particular person is part of it).

When it comes to comparisons of countries, the United States is generally one that is used as a benchmark. And the likelihood of the above progression — from marriage to parenthood to divorce to loss of custody — is slightly greater, at 25.9 percent, in the United States. However, joint custody has become an integral part of U.S. society, and even though 68 percent of mothers receive both sole legal and physical custody in a U.S. divorce, a man who truly desires custody and makes the effort to obtain such is usually going to be accorded some form of it.

As for the second type of criticism — it has never happened to me — well, good for you! Me neither.

So, what is a foreigner deeply in love with a Japanese national and eager to make little Himes and Taros to do? Residing outside Japan is probably the best option. Japan has yet to sign the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, but is reportedly planning to do so by 2010. For the most part, overseas courts would accord greater protection of custodial rights for both parents. And we can only hope that changes that will need to be made to comply with this treaty will encourage alterations to law that will encourage the introduction of joint custody here in Japan.

But as we continue through this Olympic week and into the next — weeks that are sure to be filled with intense, core-emanating, possibly desperate cries for the success of ‘ol « NI-PPON, » followed by tears that deprive one of breath, or jubilation that rivals life’s greatest climaxes — perhaps we should review the intended purpose of these games, as exemplified in the Olympic Creed: « The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well. »

This creed could also apply to marriage, parenthood and divorce. There is a reason why pride is one of the seven deadly sins: When winning takes precedence in any of these joint endeavors, a great mess is usually left by the one who has triumphed and conquered, and the remaining institution is left blackened. Those in mixed marriages would be wise to tread carefully during these Olympic weeks. Or better yet, cheer for Iceland!

Au Japon, la garde partagée est un combat

(Japanese translation below)

Reportage
Au Japon, la garde partagée est un combat
LE MONDE | 28.07.08 | 14h25 • Mis à jour le 28.07.08 | 14h55

TOKYO CORRESPONDANCE

http://www.lemonde.fr/asie-pacifique/article/2008/07/28/
au-japon-la-garde-partagee-est-un-combat_
1077872_3216.html#ens_id=1077966

http://www.lemonde.fr/web/imprimer_element
/0,40-0@2-3216,50-1077872,0.html

« Il y a deux ans, alors que j’étais au travail, mon épouse a quitté la maison avec notre fils de 1 an et 9 mois. La dernière fois que j’ai vu mon enfant, c’était en janvier, pendant une heure. » Comme ce Japonais désireux de conserver l’anonymat, quelque 166 000 parents, japonais ou étrangers, sont chaque année privés du droit de voir leur(s) enfant(s) après une séparation. En cause : une justice qui fonctionne encore sur des principes d’organisation familiale hérités de l’ère Meiji (1868-1912), qui ne reconnaît ni le droit de visite ni le partage de l’autorité parentale et ne considère pas l’enlèvement d’enfant par l’un des parents comme un crime.

« Dans la situation juridique actuelle du Japon, le parent le plus prompt à emmener les enfants avec lui en obtient la garde », explique, dans un document sur le droit parental au Japon, Richard Delrieu, professeur à l’université Kyoto-Sangyo, lui-même privé de son enfant et président de l’association SOS Parents Japan. « Le kidnapping est toléré par le tribunal, ajoute-t-il. Après six mois de résidence des enfants à leur nouveau domicile, le parent kidnappeur prend un avantage juridique sur l’autre parent, déterminant pour l’attribution de la garde. »

La pratique est si ancrée qu’elle dépasse parfois le cadre du couple. « Ma femme a succombé à un cancer il y a deux ans, se souvient Paul Wong, un Américain. Depuis, ma fille vit chez mes ex-beaux-parents. Quand j’ai essayé de la récupérer, ils m’ont attaqué en justice. » Le tribunal s’est prononcé en faveur des beaux-parents, et M. Wong s’est vu privé de son droit parental.

Ces privations concernent parfois des mères. Masako Aeko ne sait pas où habitent son ex-mari et son fils de 13 ans, rentrés au Japon après un divorce – assorti d’une garde partagée – réglé devant la justice au Canada, où la famille résidait.

Mais dans 80 % des cas, c’est le père qui perd tout contact avec son ou ses enfants. Une situation vécue par Steven Christie, un Américain séparé – mais non divorcé – de sa femme japonaise et qui n’a pas vu son fils depuis trois ans hors des tribunaux. « J’ai pu passer une heure avec lui dans une salle du tribunal des affaires familiales de Tokyo, sous vidéosurveillance, raconte-t-il. Je n’avais pas le droit de poser de questions. Si je l’avais fait, mon fils avait pour instruction de ne pas répondre et l’entretien aurait été interrompu. »

Ces situations, où sont contredits les devoirs élémentaires du mariage (vie commune et assistance mutuelle) et où l’abandon de domicile avec un enfant n’est pas considéré comme un enlèvement, témoignent du vide juridique existant au Japon. « Le problème est que la loi sur la famille est conçue pour respecter l’autonomie du foyer, explique l’avocat et professeur de droit Takao Tanase. Le droit n’interfère pas dans les affaires du foyer. »

La question de la garde doit faire l’objet de négociations entre les deux époux. Si un accord est impossible, le tribunal devient l’ultime recours. Mais il fonde ses décisions sur le principe – inscrit, lui, dans le droit japonais – d’un seul parent détenteur de l’autorité parentale en cas de divorce.

Ce principe est un héritage de l’ère Meiji. « Après 1868, la nouvelle forme légale de la famille a renforcé son aspect patriarcal », écrivait, en 1984, Kenji Tokitsu dans les Cahiers internationaux de sociologie. Elle a été remplacée en 1945 par une « structure égalitaire » restée « en décalage avec la pratique ». Dans ce contexte, l’accent est toujours mis sur la « continuité et le maintien de la famille ». En cas de divorce, l’un des parents sort de la famille, de la « maison » – « uchi », en japonais – et crée, de fait, un deuxième « uchi », sans rapport avec son ancienne maison.

« En Occident, l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant est de voir les deux parents, note Thierry Consigny, conseiller de l’Assemblée des Français de l’étranger. Au Japon, il est de vivre dans une maison de manière stable. » La signature, en 1994, par Tokyo, de la convention de New York sur le droit des enfants à voir les deux parents n’a rien changé.

Le droit de visite, qui n’apparaît que dans la jurisprudence, reste difficile à faire admettre. « Quand j’ai essayé d’imposer, comme condition d’acceptation du divorce, le droit de pouvoir rencontrer mon fils deux fois par mois, raconte un Français d’Osaka, j’ai senti une évidente incompréhension de la part du comité de conciliation et de mon ex-épouse. »

« Au cas où il est attribué par le tribunal au moment du divorce, souligne M. Delrieu, ce droit n’excède généralement pas une visite par mois. » Il est accordé dans 20 % des cas, mais le vide juridique et l’impuissance des tribunaux japonais permettent au parent qui assure la garde des enfants de le refuser.

Ces problèmes commencent à susciter des réactions, notamment de la part de parents japonais. La société nippone a évolué et l’implication grandissante des pères dans l’éducation des enfants rend la séparation plus douloureuse.

L’autre facteur est la pression des pays étrangers, conséquence de la forte progression des mariages mixtes (44 701 en 2006, contre 27 727 en 1995) et des séparations dans plus de 40 % des cas. Le nombre d’affaires d’enlèvements – souvent suivis de demande de dommages et intérêts, voire de la négation de la culture du parent étranger – recensé par les consulats des pays européens et d’Amérique du Nord atteint 159, dont 40 aux Etats-Unis, 30 en Grande-Bretagne et 20 en France, mais il pourrait y en avoir beaucoup plus.

Le département d’Etat américain signale dans ses conseils aux voyageurs allant au Japon qu’à sa connaissance, « il n’existe aucun cas d’enfant enlevé aux Etats-Unis par un parent ayant pu y revenir sur ordre d’un tribunal japonais ».

La présidence française de l’Union européenne aurait fait de la question de la non-présentation d’enfants au Japon l’une de ses priorités. Une coordination entre l’Europe, les Etats-Unis et le Canada se mettrait au point.

Avec SOS Parents Japan et l’appui de certains élus, 18 associations japonaises ont manifesté le 13 juillet à Tokyo. Leurs demandes portent notamment sur la signature de la convention de La Haye sur les aspects civils des déplacements illicites d’enfants, l’inscription dans la loi japonaise du droit de visite pour les parents séparés et divorcés ainsi que l’attribution aux tribunaux des affaires familiales de moyens coercitifs pour l’application réelle de leurs décisions.

Le quotidien Asahi signalait, le 10 mai, que la ratification de la convention de La Haye pourrait intervenir en 2010. Le ministère de la justice ne confirme pas.

Tamiko Nakamura, avocate membre du Comité sur la législation familiale, ne se montre guère optimiste. « Je ne pense pas que la société japonaise soit prête à évoluer sur ces questions, regrette-t-elle. La majorité, y compris au sein de la classe politique et du monde judiciaire, considère toujours qu’une garde partagée augmente les problèmes et perturbe l’enfant. »

Philippe Mesmer

—————————————

共同監護が戦いとなる日本 (『ル・モンド』記事、日本語訳)

2008年7月29日付『ル・モンド』記事 
  
          共同監護が戦いとなる日本

東京特派員

「2年前、私が仕事に行っている間に、妻は1歳9ヶ月になる私たちの息子を連れて家を出ていきました。一番最近私が息子に会ったのは1月で、1時間だけでした。」この匿名希望の日本人男性と同じように、毎年16万6千人ほどの日本人および外国人の親たちが、別居後自分たちの子供に会う権利を奪われている。それには理由がある。司法の場が、いまだ明治時代から引き継がれた家族構成原理を前提に機能していて、そこでは面接交渉権も共同親権も認められず、また一方の親による子供の奪取も犯罪とはみなされていない。

「日本における現行の法律の状況では、先に子供を連れ去った親のほうが監護権を得るのです」と京都産業大学講師のリシャール・デルリュー氏は日本の親権に関する報告の中で語っている。彼自身子供を奪われ、現在SOS Parents Japan会長を務める。「裁判所は誘拐行為を黙認している」と彼は付け加える。「誘拐した親は子供を新しい住居に6ヶ月間住まわせてしまえば、もう一方の親に対して裁判の上で有利になり、それは監護権の獲得にとって決定的となるのです。」

こうしたやり口はあまりに一般化しており、時には配偶者間の枠をはみ出しても行われる。「私の妻は2年前にがんで亡くなりました」と回想するのはアメリカ人男性のポール・ウォング氏である。「それ以来、私の娘は亡妻の両親のところに住んでいます。私が娘を引き取ろうとすると、彼らは私を裁判所に訴えたのです。」裁判所は妻の両親の方に有利な判決をし、ウォング氏は親の権利を奪われてしまったのである。

時には母親のほうがこうした奪取の被害者になることもある。アエコ・マサコさんは、自分の元夫と13歳の息子がどこに住んでいるか知らない。その二人は、家族が住んでいたカナダの裁判所で共同監護つきの離婚が決められた後に日本に戻ってしまった。

しかしながら、全体の8割のケースにおいて、子供とのすべてのコンタクトを失うことになってしまうのは父親のほうである。スティーヴン・クリスティーのケースを見よう。彼はアメリカ人で、日本人妻と別居-離婚ではない―しているが、裁判所の外ではもう3年以来息子に会っていない。「わたしは東京家庭裁判所の一つの部屋で息子と一緒に1時間過ごすことができましたが、ずっとビデオカメラによる監視つきでした」と彼は語る。「わたしは質問することが許されませんでした。もし私が質問をしたならば、息子の方は答えないようにとの指令を受けているので、面会は中断させられてしまったでしょう。」

結婚の基本的義務(同居と相互協力)に反するこうした状況、子供を連れて家を出て行くことが奪取とみなされないこうした状況は日本における法律上の空洞の存在を指し示している。「問題は、家族法というものが、それぞれの家の独立性を侵さないように作られたものであるということです」と弁護士で法学教授の棚瀬孝雄氏は説明する。「法は家庭問題には介入しないのです」

監護権の問題は配偶者双方の間で交渉の対象となる。もし合意が不可能な場合には、最後の手段として裁判所に判断を求める。しかし裁判所の決定は、離婚の際にはどちらか片方の親だけが親権を持つことになるという-日本の法律にはっきり記されている-原理にのっとって行われるのである。

この原理は明治時代の遺産である。「1868年以降、新しい家族法が家長父制的側面を助長した」と1984年に『国際社会学研究誌』に書いたのがトキツ・ケンジ氏である。この法律は1945年に「平等主義的構造」に取って代わられたが、「実践には程遠い」状況のままである。こうした文脈の中ではいつも「家の維持と存続」に強調点が置かれた。離婚の際に親のどちらか一方が家族から、つまり「家」-日本語で「ウチ」-から外に出ることになるのである。そして前の家とは全く関係のない別の「ウチ」を作るのである。

「西洋においては、子供にとって最も重要な利益とされることは、両親双方に会うことである」と在外フランス議会議員のティエリ・コンシニ氏は言う。「日本では、子供が安定した形でひとつの家に住むということが最も重要な利益とされる」。日本政府は、子供が両親に会う権利に関するニューヨーク条約を1994年に批准したものの、状況は何も変わっていない。

面接交渉権は、法解釈として現れるのみで、正式に認めさせることが困難なままにとどまっている。大阪在住のフランス人は次のように語る。「私が離婚成立の条件として月2回息子に会う権利を認めさせようとしたとき、調停会議および私の元妻の両方に明らかな無理解を感じました。」

「離婚の際、面接交渉権が与えられた場合でも、それは普通1ヶ月に1回のみである」とデルリュー氏は指摘する。2割のケースにおいて面接交渉権が与えられるが、法律的空洞および裁判所側の強制力の欠如のために、監護権を持つ親が面接交渉を拒否することが可能になってしまっている。

これらの問題は、とりわけ日本人親の間で多くの反発を引き起こし始めている。日本社会も変化が進み、父親が子の教育にますます深く関るようになるにつれ、子供との別離はますますつらいものになっている。

もう一つの要因は、諸外国による外圧であるが、これは激増する国際結婚(1995年には27,427組だったのが2006年には44,701組)とその40パーセント以上が離婚するという状況の帰結である。子供の奪取事件-多くの場合、続いて慰謝料請求、さらには外国人親の文化の否定が来るが-はヨーロッパ各国および北アメリカ諸国の領事館の統計したところによると、159件にのぼり、そのうち40件はアメリカ合衆国、30件はイギリス、そして20件がフランスとなっているが、実際の数はもっと多いと考えられる。

アメリカ国務省は、日本に行く旅行者たちに対する注意事項のなかで、次のように指摘している。知られている限りにおいて「一方の親によってアメリカ合衆国から奪取された子供のうち、日本の裁判所の命令によって、アメリカに帰ってくることができたというケースは一件もない。」

EUの議長国がフランスになったことで、日本における面会拒否の問題を優先課題として取り上げることになったようである。ヨーロッパとアメリカ合衆国、そしてカナダの連携が本格化する模様である。

SOS Parents Japanおよび何人かの議員と共に、18の日本の協会が7月13日に東京でデモを行った。彼らの要求は、特に国際的な子の奪取の民事面に関するハーグ条約を批准すること、別居及び離婚した両親に対する面接交渉権を日本の法律に明記すること、そして家庭裁判所に決定を遵守させるための強制手段を与えることである。

5月10日付の朝日新聞には、ハーグ条約の批准は2010年に行われる模様とある。しかし法務省は明言を避けている。

家族法検討委員会のメンバーである弁護士の中村多美子氏は状況を全く楽観していない。「日本社会はまだこの問題について議論を進展させる状況になっていないと思います」と中村氏は嘆く。「政界、そして法曹界もふくめ、大多数の人々はいまだに共同親権が問題を増大させ、子供を混乱させてしまうと思っているのです。」

フィリップ・メスメール

(亀訳)

La dissolution du mariage reste mal acceptée

http://www.lemonde.fr/web/imprimer_element/0,40-0@2-3216,50-1077873,0.html
LE MONDE | 28.07.08 | 14h25
TOKYO CORRESPONDANCE

Le nombre de divorces au Japon a enregistré en 2007 une cinquième année consécutive de baisse. A 255 000, contre 257 475 en 2006, il reste cependant élevé, puisqu’en 1995, il ne dépassait par les 199 016. A 2,02-2,04 en 2006 – contre 1,60 en 1995 -, le taux de séparation apparaît proche de celui de la France (2,2 en 2006).

Les chiffres enregistrés dans l’Archipel en 2007 constituent une certaine surprise. Entrée en vigueur en avril de la même année, une législation permet aux épouses de retraités de toucher, en cas de séparation, jusqu’à 50 % de la pension de leur mari. Cette loi avait été adoptée en 2004 alors qu’auparavant, le versement d’un revenu régulier à l’ex-épouse dépendait de la bonne volonté du mari retraité.

Les premières discussions sur cette loi datent de 2001. Peu après, le nombre de divorces a commencé à baisser. Des craintes se sont alors exprimées, expliquant cette contraction par la volonté de beaucoup de femmes d’attendre le 1er avril 2007 pour engager des procédures en vue d’une séparation. Le phénomène devait être accentué par l’arrivée à l’âge de la retraite de la génération du baby-boom, les personnes nées entre 1947 et 1949. Certains allaient jusqu’à prédire un nombre de séparations supérieur à 300 000 pour 2007.

Au final, si le nombre de divorces des personnes mariées depuis plus de trente-cinq ans a progressé de 16 %, il n’a pas atteint les sommets redoutés, sans doute en raison des garde-fous administratifs et juridiques qui encadrent la nouvelle loi.

Plus généralement, la baisse du nombre des divorces s’accompagne d’une contraction de celui des mariages : 714 000 en 2007 contre 731 000 en 2006.

Le nombre des séparations est certes conforme à la moyenne des autres pays industrialisés. Mais cette procédure – très simple en cas de séparation par consentement mutuel et qui s’effectue, dans ce cas, auprès de la mairie du lieu de résidence – n’empêche pas les personnes séparées de continuer à souffrir d’une mauvaise image au sein de la société japonaise, où prédomine encore l’idée qu’il faut « supporter ».

Cette relative mise au ban revêt un aspect plus douloureux quand elle s’accompagne de la perte du droit de voir ses enfants, ce qui arrive dans plus de 60 % des cas.

Philippe Mesmer
—————————————

Ce père si important!

Un article de Dora Tauzin, paru dans le journal Asahi (édition du soir) du 21 février 2008

ずっと大切な「お父さん」

一時帰国していたフランスから日本の家に帰ると、愛する妻と娘の姿がない。置き手紙には「連絡は弁護士へ」。友人のジャック・コローさんの苦難はこんな場面から始まりました。
パリでは夫婦の2組に1組は離婚する、なんて言われていますが、子育てを望む男性の増加もあって、離婚した家庭では、平日と週末に分けてそれぞれの親と暮らす子どもが増えています。フランスは「共同親権制」。子どもには、父親、母親どちらとも交流する権利が保証されているのです。
日本でも離婚が増えていますが、子どもに会わせてもらえない親も増えています。それは、日本は「単独親権制」だから。親権のない親(たいてい父親)は、「会わせたくない」という親権者の意向で、親子の関係を絶たれてしまうのです。コローさんは子どもに会うための戦いをもう4年も続けています。離婚が成立した際に家裁で取り決めた、週に1度の面会の約束は1回も果たされていないのです。誕生日のプレゼントすら渡せないなんて!
コローさんのように日本人との国際結婚の場合、ハーフの娘はもうひとつの祖国フランスと触れ合うチャンスを奪われてしまいます。これは、彼女にとってアイデンティティーを確立していくうえで重要な問題です。
夫婦の関係が破綻(はたん)しても、親子の関係まで引き裂かれることはないはず。共同親権を法制化し、離れた親に会う権利を守るべきではないでしょうか。日本でも子育てに熱心な男性がずいぶん増えていますよね。私にとって父の存在はとても大きいし、今もふたりで旅行するほど仲良し。お父さんの役割は子どもにとって大切なんです!

Dora Tauzin(ドラ・トーザン) / フランス人国際ジャーナリスト

【2008年2月21日、朝日新聞マリオン】

Dual nationality children and respect of visitation rights after a divorce in Japan : A priority of the French presidency of the EU for the forthcoming six months

On the 2nd of July 2008, the French President of the European Union has announced its priorities for the forthcoming six months to the Ambassadors and Heads of Mission of the 27 member countries of the European Union.

With regard to Japan, according to European sources, the French presidency has announced the consular issue of Japan’s failure to respect parental visitation rights with their children as one of the four top priorities.

France must deal, together with other European countries, the US and Canada, with the problem of visitation rights with the children of divorced bi-national couples residing in Japan.

Around 20 French citizens are denied this right. Even when a judge decides provides visitation rights, the police do not enforce these judicial decisions. Often rather than uphold the judicial decisions, Japanes law enforcement will violate the judicial decision and often arrest the parent endeavoring to have his visitation right respected, inappropriately making false accusations that the foreign parent is being a stalker, or that he/she is menacing the public order.

According to European sources, given the absence of commitment from the Japanese administration, the French President of the European Union has invited the 27 members of the European Union to exert pressure on the Japanese government as this problem can potentially harm the image of Japan in the international community.

French

Enfants binationaux et respect du droit de visite après un jugement au Japon : une priorité de la Présidence française pour les six prochains mois

Le 2 juillet 2008, la France a présenté ses priorités pour les six prochains mois de la présidence française de l’Union Européenne aux Ambassadeurs et Chefs de mission des 27 pays membres.

De source européenne, en ce qui concerne le Japon, la Présidence française a placé les affaires consulaires en matière de non-présentation d’enfant parmi ses quatre priorités,

La France doit faire face, comme tous les autres pays de l’Union européenne, les Etats-Unis et le Canada, au problème du respect du droit de visite après un jugement de divorce dans le cas d’enfants de couples binationaux en résidence au Japon.

Plus d’une vingtaine de ressortissants français voient actuellement leur droit de visite bafoué malgré un jugement rendu au Japon. Quand bien même ce droit de visite a été légiféré par le juge des affaires familiales, il n’est pas appliqué et la police n’est d’aucun recours, si ce n’est au contraire pour interpeller le parent qui insiste pour le respect de ses droits au titre qu’il trouble l’ordre public.

En l’absence d’un quelconque engagement de l’administration japonaise à résoudre ces problèmes, la Présidence française a invité, selon nos sources européennes, les 27 pays membres de l’Union Européenne à exercer toute pression utile pour convaincre le gouvernement japonais que ce problème peut nuire à l’image du Japon sur la scène internationale.

Source : http://afe-asie-nord.org/?p=294

Manifestation du réseau Oyakonet à Tokyo, le 13 juillet 2008

Le réseau japonais Oyakonet a organisé un symposium rassemblant de nombreuses associations de parents privés de leur enfant. Nous diffuserons d’autres vidéos de cet événement très prochainement sur ce site.
Voici aujourd’hui une petite vidéo de la manifestation qui a suivi le symposium.


Manifestation Oyakonet 13 juillet 2008 from Christian Bouthier on Vimeo.

親子面会交流ネット:親権者に拒否された親たち、権利の法制化求め設立

Source : http://mainichi.jp/area/tokyo/news/20080715ddlk13040254000c.html

親子面会交流ネット:親権者に拒否された親たち、権利の法制化求め設立 /東京
◇6団体参加

離婚後、親権者に子供との面会を拒否されている親たちが13日、「親子の面会交流を実現する全国ネットワーク」を設立した。子供と面会する権利の確立を訴え、今後は法制化を求めて国などへの働きかけを行う。

民法では、離婚後の親権はどちらか一方が持ち、面会交流の権利は明文化されていない。親同士で話し合う面会の仕方はこじれがちで、裁判所に調停を申し立てることもできるが強制力がなく、無視されるケースも多いという。こうした現状から権利の法制化を求める声が高まっている。

ネットワークには「くにたち子どもとの交流を求める親の会」など6団体が参加。12日に文京区内で開いた設立集会では、3人の男女が体験を報告した。4年前に離婚した35歳の女性は「いつでも会わせる」との条件で親権を元夫に渡した。最初は月に1度は面会できたが、夫の再婚後は頻度が減り、現在は面会を拒否されているという。女性は「子供のことが心配でならない」と声を詰まらせた。

親権問題に詳しい棚瀬孝雄・中央大教授は講演で「家制度の影響で『別居した親は他人で、子供に会わせるのは有害』との意識が根強いが、それは間違いだ。子供のためにも明確なルールを作る必要がある」と指摘した。

ネットの代表者、宗像充さん(32)=国立市=は「活動を通じて、子供に会えない親がいることを知ってほしい。一人の親が親権を持つのではなく、諸外国のように『共同親権』を導入する必要がある」と話している。

【川崎桂吾】

Activités des associations de parents japonaises

Une séance de travail pour le lancement du réseau des associations luttant pour l’établissement d’un droit de visite aux enfants de la part du parent qui n’en a pas eu la garde suite à une séparation ou un divorce a eu lieu le dimanche 13 juillet. Des détails seront publiés prochainement sur ce blog. Les photos sont déjà disponibles ici :
http://france-japon.net/albumphotos/v/sosparents/

Les photos de la conférence de presse du 15 juillet 2008 sont en ligne ici :

http://france-japon.net/albumphotos/v/kishaclub01/